Nelly Shoots Down Viral Story of Losing $300,000 in a Duffel Bag

Maybe it was just a dream? Nelly took to social media on Tuesday (Jan. 11) to deny reports that he left $300,000 cash at a bowling alley in St. Louis.

The rumor first made the rounds on the Internet after an unnamed woman claimed she’d found the cash stashed in a duffel bag. But according to the good Samaritan’s telling, her alleged thoughtful act of kindness didn’t get her very far.

“We up here at the bowling alley, she found Nelly[‘s] bag, it had $300,000 in it,” the woman’s friend says in the now-viral video before adding, “And guess what she do? She gave it back.”

From there, the man turns the camera to the woman in question and spouts, “Tell ’em what they give you,” to which she moans, “A hundred dollars!”

However, if you ask Nelly, the story never even happened. “Cap…SUUUUUUUPPPPPEEEEEERRRR CAAPPP,” he commented under a video post from a gossip site that had shared the woman’s account, adding, “I didn’t lose sh– idk what bag or [whose] bag they talkin bout but it dam show wasn’t mine.”

Back in October, the “Hot in Herre” rapper was honored at the 2021 BET Hip Hop Awards as the recipient of the ceremony’s I Am Hip-Hop Award just a few weeks after dropping his eighth full-length studio set, Heartland, which earned the rapper his first top 10 entry on Billboard‘s Top Country Albums chart.

Since releasing the country-rap project — which included collaborations with Florida Georgia Line, Kane Brown, Darius Rucker, Jimmie Allen and more — Nelly’s announced he’s planning a sister album to the LP, this time featuring a lineup of all female guest features.

Check out Nelly’s response to the $300,000 story below.

Nelly Shoots Down Viral Story of Losing $300,000 in a Duffel Bag

Maybe it was just a dream? Nelly took to social media on Tuesday (Jan. 11) to deny reports that he left $300,000 cash at a bowling alley in St. Louis.

The rumor first made the rounds on the Internet after an unnamed woman claimed she’d found the cash stashed in a duffel bag. But according to the good Samaritan’s telling, her alleged thoughtful act of kindness didn’t get her very far.

“We up here at the bowling alley, she found Nelly[‘s] bag, it had $300,000 in it,” the woman’s friend says in the now-viral video before adding, “And guess what she do? She gave it back.”

From there, the man turns the camera to the woman in question and spouts, “Tell ’em what they give you,” to which she moans, “A hundred dollars!”

However, if you ask Nelly, the story never even happened. “Cap…SUUUUUUUPPPPPEEEEEERRRR CAAPPP,” he commented under a video post from a gossip site that had shared the woman’s account, adding, “I didn’t lose sh– idk what bag or [whose] bag they talkin bout but it dam show wasn’t mine.”

Back in October, the “Hot in Herre” rapper was honored at the 2021 BET Hip Hop Awards as the recipient of the ceremony’s I Am Hip-Hop Award just a few weeks after dropping his eighth full-length studio set, Heartland, which earned the rapper his first top 10 entry on Billboard‘s Top Country Albums chart.

Since releasing the country-rap project — which included collaborations with Florida Georgia Line, Kane Brown, Darius Rucker, Jimmie Allen and more — Nelly’s announced he’s planning a sister album to the LP, this time featuring a lineup of all female guest features.

Check out Nelly’s response to the $300,000 story below.

Earl Swavey, Los Angeles Rapper, Dies at 26

Earl Swavey, a Los Angeles-based rapper who was a protégé of A$AP Yams, has died, Pitchfork reported first on Tuesday (Jan. 11). He was 26.

His cause of death remains unknown.

Swavey was raised in South L.A. by a single mother and began pursuing rap after being influenced by his brother, cousin and Top Dawg Entertainment signee Jay Rock, as well as T.I., Rick Ross and 50 Cent, according to Pitchfork. His song “Beef” from the 2013 mixtape Business Before Pleasure caught the attention of the A$AP leader, whom Swavey described in a 2015 interview with Grungecake was “like a brother to me.” The two linked up on the track “Uza Trikk” by duo LNDN DRGS (Grimes’ brother and rapper Jay Worthy and producer Sean House) alongside G Perico, months before Yams died from an accidental drug overdose in 2015.

“I really appreciate the fact that he help put me on. He’s a hard working man and always looking out for others,” Swavey said at the time. “Out of all of the members of A$AP, Yams was really like a brother to me. He would send me Christmas gifts and always look out for my mom, and ask if she needed anything. I could call him anytime and he would always answer, no matter what.”

Over the years, the “Hit Yo Ricky” MC has collaborated with 03 Greedo, Mozzy, SOB x RBE and Melly. In a 2018 interview with No Jumper, he shared how he planned to move his career forward. “I just plan on doing better than what I did the last time,” he explained. “As long as my sh– rises, then I feel like I’m doing good.”

He released three albums in 2021: UnphuckwitableGANGLAND and THE DIRTIEST.

“Rest in Peace to the great Earl Swavey,” Vince Staples tweeted on Monday.

See how Swavey’s peers have been paying tribute below.

Earl Swavey, Los Angeles Rapper, Dies at 26

Earl Swavey, a Los Angeles-based rapper who was a protégé of A$AP Yams, has died, Pitchfork reported first on Tuesday (Jan. 11). He was 26.

His cause of death remains unknown.

Swavey was raised in South L.A. by a single mother and began pursuing rap after being influenced by his brother, cousin and Top Dawg Entertainment signee Jay Rock, as well as T.I., Rick Ross and 50 Cent, according to Pitchfork. His song “Beef” from the 2013 mixtape Business Before Pleasure caught the attention of the A$AP leader, whom Swavey described in a 2015 interview with Grungecake was “like a brother to me.” The two linked up on the track “Uza Trikk” by duo LNDN DRGS (Grimes’ brother and rapper Jay Worthy and producer Sean House) alongside G Perico, months before Yams died from an accidental drug overdose in 2015.

“I really appreciate the fact that he help put me on. He’s a hard working man and always looking out for others,” Swavey said at the time. “Out of all of the members of A$AP, Yams was really like a brother to me. He would send me Christmas gifts and always look out for my mom, and ask if she needed anything. I could call him anytime and he would always answer, no matter what.”

Over the years, the “Hit Yo Ricky” MC has collaborated with 03 Greedo, Mozzy, SOB x RBE and Melly. In a 2018 interview with No Jumper, he shared how he planned to move his career forward. “I just plan on doing better than what I did the last time,” he explained. “As long as my sh– rises, then I feel like I’m doing good.”

He released three albums in 2021: UnphuckwitableGANGLAND and THE DIRTIEST.

“Rest in Peace to the great Earl Swavey,” Vince Staples tweeted on Monday.

See how Swavey’s peers have been paying tribute below.

Katy Perry’s ‘Dark Horse’ Copyright Accuser Faces Skeptical Appeals Court

A federal appeals court on Tuesday (Jan. 11) looked unlikely to reinstate a $2.8 million copyright verdict against Katy Perry over 2013 chart-topper “Dark Horse,” with one judge even saying he had to re-listen multiple times just to identify the “purported similarities” to an earlier song.

During an hour-long hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit appeared skeptical of accusations leveled by a rapper named Flame that Perry’s hit had infringed the copyright to his earlier track called “Joyful Noise.”

The case made headlines in 2019 when Perry was hit with a $2.8 million verdict, but a federal judge later voided that verdict on the grounds that the short snippet allegedly copied by Perry was too basic to have been covered by copyright.

Flame is currently is asking the Ninth Circuit to reverse that ruling, but at Tuesday’s hearing, the panel didn’t seem particularly inclined to do so. At one point, Judge Richard Clifton wondered why the court should extend a “monopoly” that could limit “future composers.”

“Why does the Copyright Act protect it?” Judge Clifton asked, referring to the short musical phrase allegedly copied by Perry. “Why is it that you’d give protection to that short, maybe-not-all-that-distinctive phrase?”

“Dark Horse,” released in October 2013 off Perry’s fourth album, Prism, was a smash hit. The song, which featured Juicy J, spent 57 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, including four weeks at No. 1 in early 2014.

Flame, whose real name is Marcus Gray, sued Perry in July 2014, claiming she had lifted a key “ostinato” — a short series of notes that’s repeated throughout a song — from his “Joyful Noise” and used it prominently in “Dark Horse.” And the case initially went well, resulting in a $2.8 million infringement verdict against Perry in July 2019.

But in March 2020, Judge Christina A. Snyder overturned the verdict against Perry. Citing a high-profile ruling on “Stairway To Heaven” that said basic musical “building blocks” are not subject to copyright law, the judge ruled that Flame’s ostinato — comprised of just eight notes — was too simple and commonplace for protection.

Seeking to overturn that ruling on Tuesday was attorney Michael A. Kahn of the law firm Capes Sokol, who represents Flame. He told the court that Judge Snyder should not have meddled with verdict reached by a jury, arguing they had seen detailed evidence and heard extensive expert testimony before issuing their verdict in favor of Flame.

But members of the panel pushed back, suggesting that the trial judge had done nothing wrong by tossing out the verdict against Perry. Judge Milan Smith pointed out that judges themselves are clearly entitled to apply the so-called extrinsic test to filter out unprotectable elements from a copyright case.

“It seems to me that the case law says that we as judges are fully authorized and empowered and indeed required to examine the extrinsic test ourselves,” the judge said.

Echoing that line of reasoning was Christine Lepera, counsel for Perry’s label Capitol Records. She argued that Judge Snyder “did the absolute right thing” by analyzing the case and overturning the verdict. She said the judge had “fixed a wrong” committed by a jury who perhaps “wasn’t cognizant of how this should work.”

“It’s imperative to allow that so that there is not a situation where these building blocks are monopolized,” said Lepera, an attorney at the law firm Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp. “That’s the danger here.”

Near the end of the hearing, Judge Clifton took a lull in the proceedings to once again express doubt about the case against Perry. He said it had taken him several re-listens before he could even “figure out exactly what the purported similarities were.”

“After the first couple listens, I really had to focus to try figure out what little short segment matches in the same way,” Clifton said. “It took enough work that I began to wonder: how exactly does that become something protectible?”

Attorney Vincent H. Chieffo of the law firm Greenberg Traurig, representing Perry herself, also briefly took part in the arguments. But most of the defense case was handled by Lepera, who represents Capitol Records, producer Dr. Luke, and several other individuals and companies involved in the creation of “Dark Horse.”

Following the hearing, the panel will weigh the merits of the case and issue a ruling at some point in the months ahead.

Katy Perry’s ‘Dark Horse’ Copyright Accuser Faces Skeptical Appeals Court

A federal appeals court on Tuesday (Jan. 11) looked unlikely to reinstate a $2.8 million copyright verdict against Katy Perry over 2013 chart-topper “Dark Horse,” with one judge even saying he had to re-listen multiple times just to identify the “purported similarities” to an earlier song.

During an hour-long hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit appeared skeptical of accusations leveled by a rapper named Flame that Perry’s hit had infringed the copyright to his earlier track called “Joyful Noise.”

The case made headlines in 2019 when Perry was hit with a $2.8 million verdict, but a federal judge later voided that verdict on the grounds that the short snippet allegedly copied by Perry was too basic to have been covered by copyright.

Flame is currently is asking the Ninth Circuit to reverse that ruling, but at Tuesday’s hearing, the panel didn’t seem particularly inclined to do so. At one point, Judge Richard Clifton wondered why the court should extend a “monopoly” that could limit “future composers.”

“Why does the Copyright Act protect it?” Judge Clifton asked, referring to the short musical phrase allegedly copied by Perry. “Why is it that you’d give protection to that short, maybe-not-all-that-distinctive phrase?”

“Dark Horse,” released in October 2013 off Perry’s fourth album, Prism, was a smash hit. The song, which featured Juicy J, spent 57 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, including four weeks at No. 1 in early 2014.

Flame, whose real name is Marcus Gray, sued Perry in July 2014, claiming she had lifted a key “ostinato” — a short series of notes that’s repeated throughout a song — from his “Joyful Noise” and used it prominently in “Dark Horse.” And the case initially went well, resulting in a $2.8 million infringement verdict against Perry in July 2019.

But in March 2020, Judge Christina A. Snyder overturned the verdict against Perry. Citing a high-profile ruling on “Stairway To Heaven” that said basic musical “building blocks” are not subject to copyright law, the judge ruled that Flame’s ostinato — comprised of just eight notes — was too simple and commonplace for protection.

Seeking to overturn that ruling on Tuesday was attorney Michael A. Kahn of the law firm Capes Sokol, who represents Flame. He told the court that Judge Snyder should not have meddled with verdict reached by a jury, arguing they had seen detailed evidence and heard extensive expert testimony before issuing their verdict in favor of Flame.

But members of the panel pushed back, suggesting that the trial judge had done nothing wrong by tossing out the verdict against Perry. Judge Milan Smith pointed out that judges themselves are clearly entitled to apply the so-called extrinsic test to filter out unprotectable elements from a copyright case.

“It seems to me that the case law says that we as judges are fully authorized and empowered and indeed required to examine the extrinsic test ourselves,” the judge said.

Echoing that line of reasoning was Christine Lepera, counsel for Perry’s label Capitol Records. She argued that Judge Snyder “did the absolute right thing” by analyzing the case and overturning the verdict. She said the judge had “fixed a wrong” committed by a jury who perhaps “wasn’t cognizant of how this should work.”

“It’s imperative to allow that so that there is not a situation where these building blocks are monopolized,” said Lepera, an attorney at the law firm Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp. “That’s the danger here.”

Near the end of the hearing, Judge Clifton took a lull in the proceedings to once again express doubt about the case against Perry. He said it had taken him several re-listens before he could even “figure out exactly what the purported similarities were.”

“After the first couple listens, I really had to focus to try figure out what little short segment matches in the same way,” Clifton said. “It took enough work that I began to wonder: how exactly does that become something protectible?”

Attorney Vincent H. Chieffo of the law firm Greenberg Traurig, representing Perry herself, also briefly took part in the arguments. But most of the defense case was handled by Lepera, who represents Capitol Records, producer Dr. Luke, and several other individuals and companies involved in the creation of “Dark Horse.”

Following the hearing, the panel will weigh the merits of the case and issue a ruling at some point in the months ahead.

Where to Pre-Order ‘Encanto’ Funko Pop Figurines

Can’t get enough of Encanto? You’re not the only one.

The Pixar film centering around a Colombian family with magical powers, which premiered in theaters over Thanksgiving weekend before arriving on Disney+ in late December, has already raked in more than $200 million worldwide and the soundtrack shoots to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart this week.

To celebrate the magic of the Madrigal family, Funko Pop will release a line of vinyl figurines later this month. Announced last October, the collection features miniature figurines of Mirabel, Isabela, Antonio, Bruno, Abuela Alma and more characters from the movie.

The first batch of Funko Pop vinyl figurines will be released Jan. 18. Each figurine measures around 4 inches tall, making them perfect to display on a shelf, dresser, desk or even a nightstand.

The figurines retail for $12 each and are available for pre-order at Amazon and Game Stop, in addition to the Funko Pop store.

These adorable little collectibles come protected in a plastic display case, but if you’re looking for something more durable, keep your Funko Pop figurines secure in any of these hard plastic display cases available on Amazon.

Fans will have to wait a little while longer for the Mirabel Funko Pop figurines, which will be released in early October, but as any smart collector knows, it’s better to pre-order months in advance just in case the figurines sell out. Click here to pre-order the Funko Pop Mirabel vinyl figurine.

Want more Encanto merch? From T-shirts  to jewelry, shopDisney offers a massive collection of Encanto goodies for fans of all ages. The collection includes this Mirabel Singing Encanto Doll, an Encanto Deluxe Figurine Play Set, Mirabel kids costumes and pullover sweatshirt for adults.

Also included in the Encanto collection at shopDisney, this cute little mini backpack from Loungefly, or a faux leather crossbody bag with beautifully embroidered butterflies and flowers. You’ll also find earrings, makeup brushes, eyeshadow palettes, lip gloss, blush, pajamas, jackets, books, karaoke machines, headphones and tons more Encanto-inspired gear online.

And if you’re looking to add Encanto to your DVD or Blu-ray collection, the movie is available for pre-order at Walmart and other major retailers.

Encanto, Mirabel Madrigal, Disney, Funko Pop!


Encanto, Mirabel Madrigal, Disney, Funko Pop!