Latin Artist on the Rise: Cami on Scoring a Grammy Nod With Ultra-Personal Album ‘Monstruo’

Born out of a state of vulnerability, Cami’s Monstruo is a potent pop-rock album with profound and achingly personal lyrics that touch on heartbreak, lust and grief.

The bold album scored the emerging Chilean singer-songwriter her first Grammy nomination: Monstruo is up for best Latin rock or alternative album against Fito Paez’s La Conquista del Espacio, Lido Pimienta’s Miss Colombia, Cultura Profética’s Sobrevolando and Bajofondo’s Aura.

Monstruo is a super intimate album. I wrote it from a dark, vulnerable place and in a state of transition,” the 24-year-old singer says. “It’s beautiful to see that these types of songs can connect with people.”

Growing up in a musical household, Cami learned to play the flute at age 6 and would listen to anything her parents played. “I listened to all types of music and that helped me so much when it came to motivation and inspiration,” she says. “I’d listen to classical, salsa, tango, folk, just about everything.”

Crediting her dynamic sound to her diverse upbringing, Cami is hesitant to box herself into one genre. “I’m still discovering my sound. I’m on a constant search because I’d hate to feel comfortable. I mean, I’m happy with what I do, but I don’t want to think that I’ve reached my maximum point. I still have so much more to give.”

For now, Cami is focused on finishing up her third album, which she promises will be “super feminist” and “powerful.”

Learn more about this week’s Latin Artist on the Rise below.

Name: Camila Anastasia Gallardo Montalva

Age: 24

Major Accomplishment: “It’s not clear to me yet so I can’t answer that. I feel like I’m still so young. Right now my biggest accomplishment is to wake up every day. I could say the Grammy nomination, the album, but sometimes we over-romanticize accomplishments, and personally, waking up with the desire to wake up is an accomplishment already. And to be able to connect with myself, my spirituality and to write about stuff that once made me vulnerable but are now my strengths.”

Recommended Song: “‘Monstruo’ because it reaches your a spot in your soul that not many songs can reach. The feeling you get is almost almost cathartic, and sometimes we need to explode.”

What’s Next: “To keep writing for my upcoming third album, which is almost ready. I’m working with producers like Sebastian Krys and Tainy and I’m very happy. It will be a powerful conceptual album. Monstruo was about heaven and hell, and this one will be about the cosmos and the universe. A super feminist universe with profound lyrics. It’s an album I wrote in my house during quarantine and I entered a space within myself I had yet to enter because of fear. But now more than ever, it’s important for music to have a message and for me to tell my story.”

Garth Brooks Is Among 9 Country Stars to Receive Kennedy Center Honors — So Who’s Still Waiting?

Garth Brooks has received enough awards to fill a museum. Even so, the prize that was announced on Wednesday is special. Brooks is just the ninth country artist to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. And, at 58, he’s the youngest country artist ever to receive the honor. (He swipes that distinction from Dolly Parton, who was 60 when she received the honor in 2006.)

The Kennedy Center Honors were introduced in 1978, but it wasn’t until the 14th class of honorees, in 1991, that a country artist, Roy Acuff, was included. In its early years, the honors program focused on classical, traditional pop and jazz artists.

Here’s a complete list of the nine country artists who have been saluted by the Kennedy Center Honors. (They are listed in chronological order.) As stands to reason, all nine have been inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame too. Seven have received lifetime achievement awards from the Recording Academy. Five have been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Two (Willie Nelson and Brooks) have received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. But just one (Johnny Cash) has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The list is followed by a quick reminder of 16 country artists who are still waiting for this recognition.

Country artists who have received Kennedy Center Honors:

Roy Acuff: The singer, fiddler and promoter was 88 when he received the honor in 1991. In 1962, Acuff became the first living person to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. He received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 1987. Acuff died in 1992.

Johnny Cash: The singer, songwriter, musician and actor was 64 when he was honored in 1996. He was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1980 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992. He received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 1999. Cash died in 2003.

Willie Nelson: The musician, actor and activist was 65 when he was honored in 1998. He was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2001. He received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2000 and the Gershwin Prize in 2015. Nelson is 87.

Loretta Lynn: The first female country artist to receive a Kennedy Center Honor, Lynn was 71 when she was honored in 2003. The singer-songwriter was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2008. She received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2010. Lynn is 88.

Dolly Parton: The champion multi-tasker — a singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actress, author, businesswoman and humanitarian — was 60 when she was honored in 2006. That still makes her the youngest female country artist ever to get the call. She was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1999 and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2001. She received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2011. Parton is 74; she turns 75 on Jan. 19.

George Jones: The musician, singer and songwriter was 77 when he was honored in 2008. He was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992. He received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2012. Jones died in 2013.

Merle Haggard: The singer, songwriter, guitarist and fiddler was 73 when he was honored in 2010. He was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007. He received a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2006. Hag died in 2016.

Reba McEntire: The singer, songwriter and actress was 63 when she was honored in 2018. She was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011. She has yet to receive a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy. McEntire is 65.

Garth Brooks: The singer, songwriter and renowned live performer, 58, was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2012 and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2011. He received the Gershwin Prize in 2020. He has yet to receive a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy.

Top country artists who have not yet been honored by the Kennedy Center:

These 16 artists are among dozens of acts who have been voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame but have yet to receive Kennedy Center Honors. They are listed in alphabetical order: Alabama, Brooks & Dunn, The Everly Brothers, Vince Gill, Emmylou Harris, Alan Jackson, Kris Kristofferson, Brenda Lee, Barbara Mandrell, Ronnie Milsap, The Oak Ridge Boys, Ricky Skaggs, The Statler Brothers, George Strait, Randy Travis and Hank Williams Jr.

No country groups or duos have yet been honored by the Kennedy Center. Alabama, Brooks & Dunn, The Statler Brothers and The Oak Ridge Boys are likely vying to become the first. By contrast, three rock groups — The Who, Led Zeppelin and Eagles — have been honored, as has one R&B group (Earth, Wind & Fire). (Technically, members of those groups were honored: the then-living members of The Who and Led Zeppelin and the key members, living or dead, of Eagles and EWF.)

The Kennedy Center rarely honors artists posthumously, so the clock has presumably run out for such artists as Charley Pride, Kenny Rogers and Charlie Daniels, all of whom died last year. Even Elvis Presley, who died in 1977, a year before the Honors began, was never honored.

Phil Everly of The Everly Brothers and Lew DeWitt and Harold Reid of The Statler Brothers have died, but other members of both acts are still living.

Olivia Rodrigo Is a Mariah Carey Throwback Dream in Sequined Butterfly Top

Olivia Rodrigo is spreading her wings and taking flight with her debut single-turned-smash hit “Drivers License.” And now she’s taking after Mariah Carey with her classic butterfly top.

The 17-year-old High School Musical: The Musical: The Series star showed off her green-and-blue sequined butterfly crop top via Instagram on Wednesday, and it’s taking us back to the “Butterfly” singer’s 2000 red-carpet look.

Carey paid tribute to her Billboard 200 No. 1 album Butterfly from 1997 three years after its release when she strutted the carpet for VH1 Divas 2000: A Tribute to Diana Ross at Madison Square Garden in NYC with her rainbow-colored sequined butterfly crop top.

Rodrigo not only looks the part of a pop star, but she’s making the same chart-topping moves as one too. Spotify announced Wednesday that Rodrigo’s single “Drivers License” is No. 1 on its Global and U.S. Song Debuts charts and confirmed to Billboard that on Monday, the song set the platform’s record for most streams in a day for a non-holiday song, with more than 15.17 million global streams (and on Tuesday, the song continued to beat its own record, with over 17.01 million streams).

See Rodrigo’s butterfly pics here.

Trump Called Mike Pence a Naughty Word, So Colbert Made a ‘WAP’ Remix About It

President Donald Trump’s latest explicit conversation with Vice President Mike Pence fit too well into Stephen Colbert’s remix of “WAP” by Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion.

The New York Times reported on Jan. 13 about their intense conversation, in which the president allegedly badgered Pence one last time to overturn the election shortly before the veep headed to the Capitol for the electoral vote count and Congress confirmed President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. “You can either go down in history as a patriot or you can go down in history as a p—y,” Trump allegedly told him.

The cold open for The Late Show With Stephen Colbert featured the all-too-familiar Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 hit. But in this (White) House, each room uncovered Trump and Pence’s memories over the last four years in the minute-long spoof that was interspersed with snippets of the “WAP” music video.

“A sitting POTUS called his veep/ A name that needs bleeped/ Body part that scares Mike Pence so much/ That night he couldn’t sleep,” sang a female voice that wasn’t Cardi’s. “Donald Trump called Mike Pence a p—y/ Because he wouldn’t contest/ Trump called Pence a p—y/ Opposite of being best/ Trump called Pence a p—y/ How’s that back feel gettin’ stabbed?/ Trump called Pence a p—y/ Guess that means he’s getting grabbed/ Trump called Pence a p—y.”

Watch Colbert’s “WAP” remix below.