Texan Singer Desz Gets 4-Chair Turn With ‘Unbreak My Heart’ Cover on ‘The Voice’: Watch

Good things come to those who wait. Proof, yet again, was paid to anyone who watched The Voice right to the end on Monday night.

The night’s final audition was Desz, a 30-year-old from Houston, Texas. Showing guts and talent, the singer absolutely nailed her cover of Toni Braxton’s “Unbreak My Heart.” It wasn’t lost on the coaches, all of whom turned.

“Let me tell you why we were so enthralled by your performance. That is not an easy song to sing,” John Legend explained to the rest of the world. “You did a lot of things that personalized the song for you.”

“The fact that you chose that song means that you just set the bar, and it’s pretty high, because you’re insane,” enthused fellow Texan Kelly Clarkson.

And which team did she pick? NBC left it on a cliffhanger.

Watch the performance below.

Oneohtrix Point Never Releases Song Co-Written With The Weeknd

On Monday (Oct. 26), Oneohtrix Point Never released his latest track “No Nightmares.” Coming from his latest album Magic Oneohtrix Point Never, out this Friday via Warp, the song was co-written by Oneohtrix Point Never’s Daniel Lopatin and one Abel Tesfaye — the given name of the superstar known to most as The Weeknd. It also features vocals from Tesfaye (listed in the liner notes as The Weeknd) and Chairlift’s Caroline Polacheck.

Altogether, the trio construct a meditative cuddle puddle of synth and drifting prog rock flourishes that lull you into a pleasantly zoned-out state of zen that is a welcome respite from the frenzied cacophony of life itself. Hear it below.

“No Nightmares” is also the latest in a string of collaborations between Oneohtrix Point Never (who most recently released his soundtrack for the film Uncut Gems) and the pop phenom. OPN contributed to three tracks on The Weeknd’s massive 2020 LP After Hours (“Scared to Live,” “Repeat After Me,” and “Until I Bleed Out”) and also remixed “Save Your Tears” for a deluxe edition of the album.

Meanwhile, “Abel Tesfaye” is listed as the executive producer of Magic Oneohtrix Point Never alongside Lopatin. This high-caliber dance/pop bromance follows The Weeknd’s August collab with Calvin Harris, “Over Now.”

A No. 1 Song Written by a Solitary Songwriter Is Becoming a Thing of the Past

The revived popularity of Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams,” written by Stevie Nicks, is a reminder of an an era when No. 1 songs were frequently written by just one person.

In the ‘70s, when that song was first a hit, a whopping 44% of the songs that reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 were written by just one writer. The percentage declined just a bit in the ‘80s, to 42%, but then dove to 24% in the ‘90s, 6% in the ‘00s and 4% in the ‘10s. Not one song written by just one writer has reached No. 1 so far in the 2020s.

The last song written by just one songwriter to reach No. 1 was Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect” (which he wrote). It reached No. 1 in December 2017, boosted by a remix with Beyoncé. The last song written by a solitary female songwriter to reach No. 1 was Alicia Keys’ “Fallin’” (which she wrote). It reached No. 1 way back in August 2001.

Billboard’s Gary Trust wrote about this phenomenon five years ago (see above). Trust’s conclusion: “Pop hits penned by just one writer are now almost completely anachronistic.”

When Trust made that blunt assessment in October 2015, no song written by just one songwriter had reached No. 1 since Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” (which he wrote) 19 months prior. In the five years since Trust’s article, “Perfect” is the only song written by just one writer to reach the top spot.

You don’t have to go back to the days of Irving Berlin and Cole Porter to find a time when it was utterly normal for big hits to be written by just one person. Sixteen songs reached No. 1 on the Hot 100 in 1980. Twelve of them were written by individual songwriters working alone. Even more recently, 10 of the 12 singles that reached No. 1 between August and December 1989 were written by just one person.

The rise of hip-hop, a highly collaborative genre, is partly responsible for the change. So is the prevalence of sampling and interpolating old hits. The writers of the earlier hits are credited, which expands the number of credited songwriters.

But the change has affected all genres. There are eight songwriters listed on Ariana Grande’s new single “Positions.” It’s Grande’s third consecutive single with eight credited writers, following “Stuck With U” (a collab with Justin Bieber) and “Rain on Me” (a collab with Lady Gaga). Grande’s two singles immediately before these each had seven writers. The record for a Grande single was “7 Rings,” which had 10 credited writers (including Rodgers & Hammerstein, whose “My Favorite Things” was interpolated in the song).

We can see the change in the Grammy Awards as well. Five of the first 10 winners for song of the year (from 1958 to 1967) went to just one individual. None of the last 10 have. The last song written by just one songwriter to win song of the year was Amy Winehouse’s “Rehab,” which won 13 years ago. The 2018 award went to Bruno Mars’ “That’s What I Like,” which was co-written by eight songwriters — a category record.

The trend has even extended to country music, one of the most traditional genres.

It took a village (16 songwriters) to come up with the five songs that are vying for song of the year at the Country Music Awards on Nov. 11. This marks a big change from the early years in that category. The first 10 CMA winners for song of the year (from 1967 to 1976) were all written by just one songwriter. Just three of the last 10 winners were written by one songwriter.

Here’s a decade-by-decade recap, showing first, the percentage of all the singles that reached No. 1 on the Hot 100 in that decade that were written by just one person; then the raw numbers supporting that percentage; and finally the longest-running No. 1 hit from that decade that was written by just one person (because stats are fun, but remembering the hits of the period under discussion is even more fun).

The 1950s: 39%

This measures from the launch of the Hot 100 on Aug. 4, 1958, through the last week of the decade. In that time, there were 23 No. 1 hits. Nine were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of this period that was written by just one writer: Frankie Avalon’s “Venus” (written by Ed Marshall), five weeks at No. 1 in 1959.

The 1960s: 29%

203 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘60s. 58 were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of the decade that was written by just one writer: Percy Faith’s instrumental smash “The Theme From ‘A Summer Place’” (composed by Max Steiner), nine weeks at No. 1 in 1960. Longest-running No. 1 that had both music and lyrics by just one writer: The Monkees’ “I’m a Believer” (written by Neil Diamond), seven weeks at No. 1 in 1966-67.

The 1970s: 44%

253 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘70s. 112 were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of the decade that was written by just one writer: Debby Boone’s “You Light Up My Life” (written by Joe Brooks), 10 weeks at No. 1 in 1977. This was also the decade’s longest running No. 1 hit, period.

The 1980s: 42%

231 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘80s. 98 were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of the decade that was written by just one writer: Diana Ross & Lionel Richie’s “Endless Love” (written by Richie), nine weeks at No. 1 in 1981.

The 1990s: 24%

140 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘90s. 34 were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1s of the decade that was written by just one writer (a tie): Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” (written by Dolly Parton), 14 weeks at No. 1 in 1992-93, and Boyz II Men’s “I’ll Make Love to You” (written by Babyface), 14 weeks at No. 1 in 1994.

The 2000s: 6%

129 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘70s. Eight were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of the decade that was written by just one writer: OutKast’s “Hey Ya!” (written by Andre “3000” Benjamin), nine weeks at No. 1 in 2003-04.

The 2010s: 4%

116 singles reached No. 1 in the ‘10s. Just five were written by just one person.

Longest-running No. 1 of the decade that was written by just one writer (a tie): Rihanna feat. Calvin Harris’ “We Found Love” (written by Harris), 10 weeks at No. 1 in 2011-12, and Williams’ “Happy” (written by Williams), 10 weeks at No. 1 in 2014.

The 2020s: 0%

17 singles have reached No. 1 so far in the ‘20s. None were written by just one person.

Idina Menzel, Questlove, Peter Frampton & More React to Senate’s Confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Just one week away from the Nov. 3 presidential election, the Senate confirmed Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, in a 52-48 vote on Monday (Oct. 26).

The decision gives conservatives a 6-3 majority on the court, as 48-year-old Barrett fills the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last month at the age of 87. On Sunday (Oct. 25), the Democrats unsuccessfully tried to filibuster the nomination.

In light of the new Supreme Court Justice confirmation, a number of celebrities have taken to Twitter to share their disappointment over the news, with many using the phrase “6-3 doesn’t represent me. Flip states blue, stop the GOP.”

See reactions from Idina Menzel, Questlove, Peter Frampton, Will.i.am and more below.

 

Demi Lovato Is Pleading With Her Fans to Vote: ‘Nothing Will Change Unless You Take Action’

Almost two weeks after unleashing her politically-driven song “Commander in Chief,” Demi Lovato is practicing what she preaches.

The star took a selfie at the Los Angeles voting poll on Monday (Oct. 26), flaunting both her “Vote” mask and “I Voted” sticker. “I vote because I love my country,” she captioned the snap. “From my friends and family members who live here, to my neighbors and millions of people I don’t know, I love the citizens here. This year I’ve been so stressed and anxious from politics alone.”

“This post isn’t about telling you to vote for, it’s about telling you to vote PERIOD,” she continued. “I want to know that whatever the outcome is, we raised our voices and spoke up for what we wanted. And if change is what you want, nothing will change unless you take action.”

“So please, if you are old enough, please get out there and speak up. P.S. I’m so grateful to have been able to vote because it wasn’t too long ago women didn’t even have those rights.. (see what happens when we demand change?”

“Commander in Chief,” released on Oct. 14, is a bold political statement and a direct message to Donald Trump. It was intended to mobilize fans to get out and vote just weeks out from the federal election, and as part of her call to action, Lovato shared information on the voting process across her social channels.

“Please join me and vote in this year’s election. Visit https://iwillvote.com/ for more information.” she wrote.

Lil Pump Might Endorse Donald Trump, But His Label Does Not

While Lil Pump is on the Trump train this election season, Tha Lights Global is not.

The label shared a statement to Billboard on Monday afternoon (Oct. 26), a day after its signee endorsed Donald Trump for the 2020 presidential election.

“Tha Lights Global supports everyone’s right to choose a Presidential candidate, however we want to make clear we do not support Donald Trump,” Tha Lights Global CEO Dooney Battle said in the statement. “We support Joe Biden and Kamala Harris for President and Vice President because we believe they offer an alternative to an administration that has ignored systemic racial injustice, promoted hate speech and inhumane immigration policies, ignored the problem of climate change and rights of LGBTQ+ individuals as well as many other actions contrary to democratic ideals. We believe it is our obligation to speak out regarding this historic election and we believe in a free society where all of our artists can express their opinions.”

The “Gucci Gang” rapper took to Instagram to share his support for the president. “THE DAY I MET TRUMP #trump202022020,” he wrote alongside a photo of himself shaking hands with Trump. He followed up with a since-deleted, expletive-heavy clip explaining his choice, citing Biden’s tax plan that would increase taxes on the wealthy.

Here Are the Lyrics to Bebe Rexha’s ‘Baby, I’m Jealous,’ Feat. Doja Cat

Bebe Rexha reminds her man “Baby, I’m Jealous” in her new hit, featuring Doja Cat, which addresses feeling insecure about prettier girls above her on Instagram. But she’s climbing her way up the Billboard Hot 100 chart with a No. 58 debut last week (dated Oct. 24).

To avoid her self-esteem issues brought up by technology, Rexha travels back in time to the 1960s, 1800s, the caveman era and the dawn of creation Freaky Friday-style for the music video, which features special appearances by Charli D’Amelio, Nikita Dragun and more.

Check out the lyrics and music video below.

Baby, I’m jealous
Jealous, jealous, jealous, jealous, jealous, jealous

Went from beautiful to ugly
‘Cause insecurity told me you don’t love me
All it takes is a girl above me
On your timeline to make me nothing

This is me
A woman in dichotomy
I love me
Until I don’t

Baby, I’m jealous
Of the pictures that you like
Baby, I’m jealous
Of the girls with lighter eyes
Baby, I’m jealous (ooh)
And I know that it ain’t right
But I’m jealous, jealous
The jealous kind

I’m jelly, jelly, jelly, jelly, jelly on a plate
Sunnyside up, I got egg on my face
Waste trainer for a tinier waist
But I can’t help it if I like the way food taste

This is me
A woman in dichotomy
I love me
Until I don’t
My apologies
For looking on your history
I’m trying to let it go

Baby, I’m jealous
Of the pictures that you like
Baby, I’m jealous
Of the girls with lighter eyes
Baby, I’m jealous (ooh)
And I know that it ain’t right
But I’m jealous, jealous
The jealous kind

That chick can’t be that chick
Baby, I’m a bad bitch
If he fiendin’ he’ll prolly get a catfish
Keep him dreamin’ to pull up on a nap, shit
I don’t even be askin’ him, “Who dat chick?”
Uh-huh, who dat chick? Nah
That’s pitiful, that’s so average, why?
Some women want men and some girls want wives
Tell lies until they buggin’ and their pants on fire, uh
I stole your man
He got freedom to chase what he likes
I know you mad
But he ain’t even worth none of your time
It’s such a drag
I’m not being spiteful, but he’s trash
Won’t be the last
To let you know but he gon’ show you

Baby, I’m jealous
Of the pictures that you like
Baby, I’m jealous (ooh)
Of the girls with lighter eyes
Baby, I’m jealous (ooh, I’m jealous)
And I know that it ain’t right (you lied to me)
But I’m jealous, jealous (uh-huh)
The jealous kind (yeah, yeah, yeah)

I’m jealous of her
Need you number (b-baby I’m)
She doesn’t love ya
Boy, let me show ya (baby I’m jealous)
I’m jealous of her
Need your number (b-baby I’m)
She doesn’t love ya
Boy, let me show ya (b-baby I’m jealous)

Lyrics licensed & provided by LyricFind

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

Written by: Amala Zandile Dlamini, Bleta Bebe Rexha, Jason Gill, Jussi Ilmari Karvinen, Justin Drew Tranter, Pablo Bowman