The Lincoln Project Shares Powerful Music Video to Demi Lovato’s ‘Commander in Chief’

Demi Lovato unveiled her political stance in her new song “Commander in Chief,” and now the Lincoln Project is building on the track’s emotional message.

The anti-Trump political action committee shared their own music video for the song on Thursday (Oct. 15), and shows clips of the devastating effects from the president’s mismanagement of the coronavirus, of people on ventilators in hospitals and families with masks only able to talk to each other through glass doors. The scene then turns to the Black Lives Matter movement, as thousands of protesters took to the streets across the nation to demand justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and more who have been killed at the hands of police.

The vignette ends on an uplifting note, with people of all races, ages and genders coming together to vote in the presidential election.

“Demi Lovato put it best,” the description reads, and links out to a donation page for The Lincoln Project, which will go to voter outreach programs in an effort to “end the suffering, end the corruption, and end the presidency of the worst ‘Commander in Chief’ in our country’s history.”

Watch the “Commander in Chief” video below.

Here Are the Lyrics to JP Saxe’s ‘If the World Was Ending,’ Feat. Julia Michaels

JP Saxe and Julia Michaels wonder “If the World Was Ending,” you’d come over, right?

Michaels said the apocalyptic love song, coincidentally written before the COVID-19 pandemic, took on a new meaning for her. “I think now more than ever I want to be surrounded by the people that I love,” she said.

Saxe told Billboard in April that the two were inspired by the massive back-to-back earthquakes in LA in July 2019. “After the earthquakes in Los Angeles, we were talking about how our decision-making would look if we were in a world-ending situation, what that would feel like, what we would want, who we would want to be with. The song itself is very much the kind of conversation we were having,” he said in the interview.

Check out the lyrics and music video below.

I was distracted
And in traffic
I didn’t feel it
When the earthquake happened
But it really got me thinkin’
Were you out drinkin’?
Were you in the living room
Chillin’ watchin’ television?
It’s been a year now
Think I’ve figured out how
How to let you go and let communication die out

I know, you know, we know
You weren’t down for forever and it’s fine
I know, you know, we know
We weren’t meant for each other and it’s fine

But if the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over and you’d stay the night
Would you love me for the hell of it?
All our fears would be irrelevant
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
The sky’d be falling and I’d hold you tight
And there wouldn’t be a reason why
We would even have to say goodbye
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
Right?
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
Right?

I tried to imagine
Your reaction
It didn’t scare me when the earthquake happened
But it really got me thinkin’
That night we went drinkin’
Stumbled in the house
And didn’t make it past the kitchen
Ah, it’s been a year now
Think I’ve figured out how
How to think about you without it rippin’ my heart out

I know, you know, we know
You weren’t down for forever and it’s fine
I know, you know, we know
We weren’t meant for each other and it’s fine

But if the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over and you’d stay the night
Would you love me for the hell of it?
All our fears would be irrelevant
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
The sky’d be falling while I’d hold you tight
No, there wouldn’t be a reason why
We would even have to say goodbye
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over, you’d come over, you’d come over, right?

I know, you know, we know
You weren’t down for forever and it’s fine
I know, you know, we know
We weren’t meant for each other and it’s fine

But if the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over and you’d stay the night
Would you love me for the hell of it?
All our fears would be irrelevant
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
The sky’d be falling while I hold you tight
No, there wouldn’t be a reason why
We would even have to say goodbye
If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?
You’d come over, you’d come over, you’d come over, right?

If the world was ending
You’d come over, right?

Lyrics licensed & provided by LyricFind

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

Written by: Jonathan Percy Saxe, Julia Michaels

Event Designer Bobby Garza in Austin, in a Pandemic: ‘I Hope We Get Smarter About the Things We’re Doing’

When the concert business shut down in mid-March, Bobby Garza abruptly shifted from putting on live events to tearing them down — his company, Austin-based Forefront Networks, had to cancel the California food-and-music festival Yountville Live later that month, and massive productions like December’s Trail of Lights in Austin are in question, too. In early April, his life changed even more dramatically: Forefront furloughed 30 percent of its staff, including him.

As part of Billboard’s efforts to best cover the coronavirus pandemic and its impacts on the music industry, we will be speaking with Garza, a 43-year-old Forefront creative team leader who used to be general manager of festival producer Transmission Events, every other week to chronicle his experience throughout the crisis. (Read the latest installment here and see the full series here.

You mentioned you had some news to share about your contract work with the Long Center in Austin.

I do. The Long Center’s announcing a collaborative partnership with Luck ReunionWillie Nelson’s property in Luck, Texas, which has started a series of shows around South by Southwest and they’ve got a film crew that’s done some really great livestreams. They’re going to be the official streaming partner for the Long Center and we’re going to collaborate on some rad stuff, the first of which is some outdoor socially distant events here on Oct. 29.

What’s the capacity of the shows?

We have this activation on the Long Center lawn called Park Space and it is a demonstration and art project about how you can provide a safe, socially distanced configuration inside parks and on grass. We’re going to utilize that as little squares that we sell to your socially distanced pod [of] up to four people. We’ve got 75 spaces so it’ll probably be 300 people — which is not a lot of folks over a space that can generally hold about 3,000 people. And we’re going to have a show with some good music, and [food] deliveries to your pod so you don’t have to leave.

What are the economics of this? What fraction of revenue for a 3,000-capacity-concert can you make?

The biggest point is “get some activity to prove the case.” I don’t think anybody wants to lose money on this thing.

If this works out, how much do you see this as a model for other events in Austin or elsewhere?

That’s the hope. There’s this pool of event producers and workers that are out of work, and if we can help provide them some help to “how do you get through this,” well, let’s do that. For me, and other people like me, live music is a thing we need in our lives right now, and we want to figure out how to do that.

Have you announced any artists?

Not yet. We’ll have a lineup probably within a week or so.

What were the logistical challenges of getting to this point?

We had to determine the set of COVID-era guidelines for what people can do and what they expect when they come. We have to make sure we incorporate well-checks — that might increase your wait time. We feel like we messaged this stuff appropriately and people are going to be hungry to see stuff. We had to work with the concessionaires and how we deliver food and beverage to pods through an app-based system. We’re fortunate the concessionaires [at] the Long Center are an asset, so no standing around on bars, stick to your pod, order your stuff, get it there. There are a lot of extra steps that we’re having to think through but they seem pretty achievable.

Is this how concerts will work in the foreseeable future?

On some level, at least for the immediate future, it’s going to be the new normal for a lot of people, having to deal with all these extra things to make sure it’s right.

Is there ever going to be an old normal again at this point?

Some of these precautions are things we’re always going to need to think about — and I don’t necessarily know it’s a bad thing. I was reading some article positing this theory that the trend has been to pack more people into spaces and “bigger, bigger, bigger was better.” Now there’s a quality discussion: How do you balance what’s affordable to most folks and a level of quality to what it is you’re doing? The event industry has always had to roll with the punches of the time — so increased security and increased screening after Las Vegas and, even before that, thinking about ingress and egress and crowd flow and crowd management.

Are you starting to see a timeline where a concert restart comes into view? I think I’ve asked you this question 10 times.

Is there an end to this? I don’t know. On some level, we’re going to have to be thinking about public health and public safety and that’s just another thing we have to reasonably plan for. Some of that is totally achievable. It probably requires event producers to think about their financial model in a different way. I don’t know when the next time you see 100,000 people in front of a stage at a festival is going to be.

How much hope is there that after the election, a new group of legislators can figure out some of these solutions?

God, I sure hope we get smarter about the things that we’re doing. We need systemic health for our industry and I don’t necessarily know that our leaders are appreciating the urgency of what that is. We’ve had some venues in Austin close and that’s a tragedy. The city has responded by creating a $5 million live-music venue fund — while that’s incredibly positive, venues are still waiting to figure out the dispersal mechanisms and the eligibility criteria.

How’s learning music with your kids?

We’ve kind of stopped. The school stuff has been vexing, man, I’ve got to tell you. Every parent has been struggling with the same thing: “I’m going to buy a desk and find another space for the kids to work.” And if you have multiple kids, how can you put them on a Zoom call that allows them to focus? Kids are incredibly resilient. If you can provide some level of consistency [so] they learn to anticipate, there’s a little bit of comfort in, “I’ve got to work on math at 10 a.m.” But it could end up being disastrous. Missing the entire social component of school is a thing I worry about. How do you move through the world only experiencing other people through Zoom?

Anything else going on?

One thing I’ve started instituting with my kids, and for me personally, is some meditation and mindfulness practices. That’s helped me manage and mitigate the levels of stress and move through the world a little more peacefully. We all could use that right now.

Coronavirus

11 Best Britney Spears Covers, From Miley Cyrus’ ‘Gimme More’ to Madonna’s ‘Toxic’

Miley Cyrus had us pleading for more with her glamorous cover of Britney Spears’ “Gimme More” during her Miley Cyrus Backyard Sessions special edition of MTV Unplugged on Friday (Oct. 16).

But Cyrus is hardly the first star to take on a classic by the princess of pop. Musicians from every genre and generation have put their spins on Spears’ biggest hits, paying tribute to the timeless icon.

While there are truly countless covers to sort through, we at Billboard have compiled 11 of our favorites. See them below.

Miley Cyrus, “Gimme More”

Cyrus looked like 1980s superstar in a flowy zebra-print dress, matching gloves, big black-and-white sunglasses, gold accessories and, of course, her blonde mullet and a red lip. She performed a rocked-out rendition of Spears’ 2007 hit “Gimme More” with her characteristic rasp and Southern twang.

Madonna, “Toxic”

While performing at the 2016 Art Basel in Miami Beach, the Material Girl honored her former “Me Against the Music” collaborator by performing a haunting rendition of “Toxic.” Images of a “toxic” Donald Trump appeared on a large screen behind her during the song.

Hozier, “Toxic”

As the coronavirus began to spread at a rapid rate, Hozier joined the lineup of superstars to participate in the Together, At Home: WHO-Global Citizen Solidarity Sessions in March 2020. Amid performances of his own songs, the Irish crooner snuck in his own, sultry version of “Toxic.”

Selena Gomez, tour medley

Back in 2011, when Selena Gomez officially kicked off her We Own The Night tour in Boca Raton, Florida, the star weaved in a medley of Spears’ biggest hits. She sang an assortment of her Disney idol’s tracks, “Baby One More Time,” “(You Drive Me) Crazy,” I’m A Slave 4 U,” “Oops! . . . I Did It Again,” “Toxic” and “Hold It Against Me.”

Meghan Trainor, “Lucky”

During Meghan Trainor’s Billboard Live At-Home concert in April 2o2o, raising money for Feeding America, the singer performed “one of my favorite songs ever,” Spears’ 2000 track, “Lucky,” with a calming, ukulele twist on the pop tune.

Kelly Clarkson, “Toxic”

For her popular talk show “Kellyoke” segment, Clarkson delivered a seductive rendition of “Toxic” in February 2020, complete with flashing green lights and the Idol alum’s flawless vocal range.

Ed Sheeran, “…Baby One More Time”

As part of Spotify’s Singles program in 2017, Sheeran performed a stripped-down cover of Spears’ debut hit “…Baby One More Time.” The “Shape Of You” singer gave the track a raw, emotive rework with only acoustic guitar strums as his backing.

Radio Disney Icon Awards Tribute

Spears received the first-ever Icon Award at the 2017 Radio Disney Music Awards, and to celebrate the pop star, recording artists Kelsea BalleriniHailee Steinfeld and Sofia Carson performed a medley of some of Spears’ biggest hits, including “Oops!…I Did It Again,” “Circus,” and “…Baby One More Time.”

Jamie Lynn Spears then joined the trio, surprising her sister and bringing tears to her eyes, with a rendition of “Till The World Ends.”

Taylor Swift, “Lucky”

A young, curly-haired Swift performed “Lucky” while on tour. The ode to young starlets was met with an arena full of fans singing the song in unison.

Melanie Martinez, “Toxic”

When Martinez auditioned for season three of The Voice, she chose a breathy, acoustic cover of “Toxic” as her audition song. Judges Adam Levine, Blake Shelton and Cee Lo Green all turned their chairs, and Martinez ended up choosing the Maroon 5 frontman as her coach.

Alex Trebek Is a ‘Savage,’ Thanks to This Remix of His Megan Thee Stallion ‘Jeopardy!’ Clue

Alex Trebek proudly read out the lyrics to Megan Thee Stallion’s No. 1 hit “Savage” for a Jeopardy! clue, and just like the original song, the remix is already here.

When contestant Daniel Lee, an orthopedic surgeon from South Pasadena, Calif., picked the $1,000 answer in the “On the Billboard Charts in 2020″ category, Trebek packed some extra oomph in his voice when reading “classy, bougie, ratchet” and “sassy, moody, nasty.” Luckily, Lee got the right answer after Trebek glared at him for saying, “What is ‘I’m a Savage’?” before eventually stating, “What is ‘Savage’?”

Now, a Twitter user has remixed the 80-year-old TV host’s clue to sound like the song’s chorus. And yes, Trebek even says the word “bitch” from a clip of him reading out a Walkman clue.

Trebek has been polishing his rapping skills over the years, after delivering famous bars from Drake’s “Started from the Bottom,” Kanye West’s “Famous,” Desiigner’s “Panda,” Lil Wayne’s “6 Foot 7 Foot” and Kendrick Lamar’s “m.A.A.d. City” back in 2017. And he’s familiar with the “Don’t Stop” rapper after she first appeared as a clue in October 2019 when he read, “Oddly, female rapper Megan Pete calls herself ‘Megan Thee’ this word for a male horse.”

Megan’s official “Savage” remix, featuring Beyoncé, landed at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in May, becoming her career-first chart-topping song.

Watch Trebek’s “Savage” clue get an unofficial remix below.

In Demand: Creative Director Lewis James Details Post Malone’s Ambitious Billboard Music Awards Set

Two years into attending Central Saint Martins – University of the Arts London, Lewis James started spending less time in class and more time on tour with Drake. “I was getting letters and all this sh– saying, ‘Are you even a student here?’ My teachers kind of hated me, but it was cool because I was in London designing things that weren’t real yet.”

James, who studied graphic design, always had an interest in architectural design, technology and video. He recalls being blown away by Gorillaz’ music videos at a young age and, inspired by their cartoon-like nature, took up a weekly animation and filmmaking course when he was just 11 years old.

Now, nearly 15 years later, James, 25, has worked with everyone from Beyoncé and Jay-Z to Post Malone — and even more emerging artists like Canadian alternative singer Tate McRae. James calls social media “a great catalyst” and says that once a friend tapped him for Drake’s Summer Sixteen Tour that everything snowballed from there. Soon enough, he was teaming with creative director Travis Brothers for Post Malone’s Beerbongs & Bentleys Tour in 2018. They’ve remained “partners in crime on all things Post” ever since.

Lately, James has been designing a handful of televised performances for the American Music Awards, the MTV Video Music Awards and, most recently, Wednesday’s Billboard Music Awards — but says with TV, “There’s only so much you can do.” That hasn’t stopped him from pushing the boundaries of what a made-for-TV awards show performance can be, best evidenced by his latest triumph with Post Malone and Tyla Yaweh’s BBMAs set, filmed in a remote location.

“It was just an explosion of all the ideas we’ve had for a while,” he says. “I don’t think there’s a crazier team to get sh– done.”

Post Malone — 2020 Billboard Music Awards

Ahead of helping design and creative-direct Post Malone’s 2018 Coachella set, the artist’s manager, Dre London, told Lewis to come by a studio on Sunset to meet the team for the first time. Lewis showed up with a laptop and several ideas, to which Post Malone replied something to the effect of: “Sick, f—ing love it.” As Lewis says, “As long as we put a lot of explosions in there, usually it’s OK. So this [BBMAs performance] was perfect, because Post loves fire and anything that makes a loud noise.” Lewis and his creative partner, Travis Brothers, had wanted to stage and direct an offsite performance for a long time, and figured with the ongoing pandemic, now was the perfect time to explore untraditional spaces. So they found a quarry 45 minutes outside of Los Angeles, which they picked both for its remote location and also the giant machinery that lent itself to scalable filming. Lewis — who was directing along with Brothers remotely — says some aspects of the performance were “a bit of a nightmare,” from the crew dealing with wet and muddy sand to loading in gear until 3 a.m. But even so, because the live music industry has been on hold for so long, he says the energy on set was higher than ever. They loaded in massive PA systems to blast music (Post Malone and Tyla Yaweh, who joined in for his “Tommy Lee” collaboration, were both equipped with in-ears and their live audio was captured on set), and Lewis estimates they spent $80,000 on the fireworks alone. “We had the opportunity to just make something huge,” says Lewis. “We really wanted to go crazy with it.”

Tate McRae — 2020 MTV Video Music Awards

Lewis first met emerging singer-songwriter Tate McRae over a webcam while helping her ideate her MTV Video Music Awards pre-show performance of her debut hit “You Broke Me First” this August. He was intrigued, from a design standpoint, by the fact that McRae is a professionally trained dancer and worked with her creative director on a simple concept that used dramatic lighting and costuming to spotlight her vocals and moves. “She had all the choreo, so there’s all that stuff you can play with in terms of the shape of the uniform and how that reacts with light and what we can do there,” says Lewis. “She’s just got a whole other skill set that lends itself really well to performance.” Plus, he says, she has an unparalleled work ethic: For the shoot [in Toronto], we just shot back-to-back nonstop dancing, like a Black Swan sort of thing.” Lewis strongly believes that every stage he helps design, no matter if it’s for an entire tour or a single TV spot, should have a concept and narrative, but with younger and newer talent in particular, it’s all about finding a balance. “You don’t want to overkill it when we start, just keeping it beautiful and simple,” he says. “I think that’s what comes across in a lot of Tate’s stuff, just letting her speak.”

Post Malone, Travis Scott and Ozzy Osborne – 2019 American Music Awards

Ahead of designing a new stage or performance setup, Lewis always starts by sketching it out on paper. “I think when you start from a computer, you’re going backwards,” he says. “You need to see it in space.” As a result, he not only has a massive archive of staging blueprints, but has also been able to physically map out an iconic moment in each of his performances. For the epic Post Malone, Travis Scott and Ozzy Osbourne performance of “Take What You Want” at last November’s AMAs — which Lewis can only describe as “a trip” — that moment came when producer-guitarist Watt seemingly tossed his guitar in the blazing flames onstage (Lewis now has that wrecked guitar in his possession). “[There has to be a moment] to stick in people’s minds,” he says. “Just having that iconography in their performance that the audience can latch onto.”

Post Malone – 2018 Beerbongs & Bentleys Tour

One of Lewis’ favorite moments from his first tour with Post Malone was the artist’s performance of “Blame It on Me.” Lewis recalls spending $13,000 just on fog for the whole tour — another effect he’s a huge fan of. “I’m always at the front of house tapping the lighting director on the back shouting, ‘More fog, more fog!’ and giving him cues when to blast it,” says Lewis. He says with “Blame It on Me” in particular, they piled it on so that Post Malone was entirely concealed at the start, though appeared on screens thanks to an onstage thermal camera. Meanwhile, the arena was only illuminated by 20-foot-high flames that Lewis says radiated enough heat for fans to feel no matter where their seats were. “I like to bring in a little bit of a weird aspect to the shows as opposed to just, you know, running a live show on what a live show is meant to be,” says Lewis. “It’s putting people in a state of the unknown, and they’re just curious for what’s going to happen next. That’s a very good spot for people to be in.”

First Spin: The Week’s Best New Dance Tracks From Griz & Jauz, Major Lazer, Whethan & More

New Music Friday is intense. Hundreds of songs drop from artists around the world, and you’re supposed to somehow find the best ones. It’s fun work, but it’s time-consuming — so we at Billboard Dance want to give you a hand. Each week, we sift through the streams and dig in the digital crates to present the absolute must-hears from the wide breadth of jams.

Friday! Again! As we ease into the weekend we have a fresh batch of clubs tracks to soundtrack our commute home, or maybe just our commute from the desk to the couch.

In any case, there’s a lot of great new music out this week, with the first release from LA party crew Space Yacht’s new label, a Galcher Lustwerk edit of Park Hye Jin “Can You,” Desert Dwellers’ tribal house-heavy collection Breath Re-Imagined Vol. 3, a collab from Patrick Topping and his wife Hayley, a shimmery Treasure Fingers remix of Pat Lok’s “Salvation,” a new album from the legends Autechre and all of the hot trax below. Let’s dig in.

Django Django, “Spirals” (MGMT Remix) 

Django Django’s “Spirals” gets a heady edit from the guys of MGMT, who add layers of spatial synth and galloping drums, turning the already excellent original into an eight-minute electronic prog rock opus that sounds like like Depeche Mode on mushrooms. (Make sure to listen all the way through to catch the song’s second — and third — movements.) Made with six handmade spinning fantascopes rotating on moving turntables, the song’s equally psychedelic video is meant to symbolize how the bonds we share as humans are stronger than the divisions. Amen.

GRiZ + Jauz, “No Doubt”

The test of a truly dank bass track is if it causes you to instinctively make your stankiest stank face upon listening, and by that standard this new bomb from Griz and Jauz passes the test with flying stankiness. Coming from Griz’s Bangers[6] EP, the producer got to work on the track after he saw Jauz tweeting about the Jakes and Joker’s track ominously hyphy “3K Lane.”

Within a few hours, Griz had passed the start of a similarly heavy track to Jauz, and the guys finished the G-funk-dripping banger over the next few weeks. It “was really fun to go back to that initial inspiration for making bass music,” Griz says in a statement. “Something grimy, swaggy, gutter.” Bangers[6] is out now via Deadbeats. 

Duck Sauce, “Mesmerize”

There is legitimately nothing we can think of about Duck Sauce that isn’t entirely delightful. And so it goes with their new single “Hypnotize,” a slick and straight ’80s high-NRG body mover that we can imagine singing to with our eyes closed in a dark club or in our shower. Possibly even more excellent is the corresponding video, an absurdist web 1.0 simulation featuring the duo’s A-Trak and Armand van Helden, along with Bruce Willis, Daniel Craig, Angelina Jolie and other stars. It makes sense when you watch it. (Seriously, just watch it.)

Whethan Feat. RL Grimes, “Outta Here”

By the age of 21 we had accomplished a few things. We had gotten into college for example, and had also graduated high school and earned a driver’s license. We had not, however, released our highly anticipated debut album, as 21-year-old producer Whethan is doing today. The Australian artist broke out on Future Classic when he was just 16, and five years later has dropped an LP reflecting his maturing skills, his eclectic taste and his influences — many of whom make appearances on Fantasy.

Amidst cameos from STRFKR, Grouplove, The Knocks and Oliver Tree comes the finale track “Outta Here” with RL Grime. Together the duo launch into deep space on walls of synth and airy trap beats that lift you up rather than hitting you over the head. (The track also evokes a little bit of Grime’s 2014 all-time jam “Core.”) “There was an underlying theme of alternative meets psychedelic dance music,” Whethan says of Fantasy in a statement, “and I wanted to be able to blast every song at my shows or have it feel like you’re at a show when listening at home or in the car.” In a moment when none of us can go to musical events that aren’t actually happening at home or in the car, his mission is effectively accomplished.

Major Lazer & Paloma Mami, “QueLoQue”

With just seven days before the release of the mew Major Lazer album, Music Is the Weapon, anticipation has reached a new peak with the release of the album’s fourth and final single, “QueLoQue.” A steamy collab with Chilean-American singer Paloma Mami, the song is an urbano track with inflections of merengue, and you can hear it live when Diplo, Ape Drums, Walshy Fire and Mami perform it as part of the band’s set at this Saturday’s virtual Save Our Stages Festival to benefit the National Independent Venue Association.

Arty, “Say My Name”

Remember hanging out in groups? Like, really big groups? And the thrill of pushing through a packed crowd, exchanging smiles with strangers and that sort of warm and delicious stench of dancing amongst 10,000 fellow music loving humans? That was all pretty great stuff.

While currently unavailable due to COVID, that mass dance party feeling is heavily evoked via the final track on Arty’s From Russia With Love 3 EP, the third and final installment of the series out today via Armada Music. The Russian producer born Artem Stolyarov says that for him and his collaborators, making the EP was an exercise in “reminiscing about the music that took the dance music scene by force between 2010 and 2012″ and that wide-eyed ‘n’ gobsmacked mainstage EDM feeling of awe this era is certainly present on the soaring and trance-inspired anthem “Say My Name.”